Archive for December, 2016

SIPs INSTALLATION

Friday, December 9th, 2016

I has been a long time since the initial blog on the SIPs house in Wanaka, so I thought I would continue the story and show the ease of the installation of the SIPs panels.

01 CNA SIPS individual panels

This first image shows the smaller individual SIPs panels that were small enough to bring to site by trailer. With fixings through the OSB sheathing into both sides of the bottom plate, these panels were very solid in themselves and didn’t really need the bracing.

02 CNA SIPS arriving on site

All the large preassembled SIPs wall panels are delivered to site on a single load of a Hiab.

03 CNA Unloading SIPS with Hiab

The panels are drilled to provide two balanced lifting points which makes positioning of panels easy for installation.

04 CNA Foam to bottom plate

Before each panel is lowered into position, expanding foam is placed along the bottom plate to fill any voids between the bottom plate and the bottom of the rigid urethane insulation core of the SIPs panels.

05 CNA air seal to SIPS panel joint

Along with the expanding foam to the bottom plate, a bead of sealant is placed against adding panels to form an air seal between the panels.  We did not rely on this air seal completely as every panel joint was sealed with Proclima Tescon Extoseal tape prior to adding any internal bates and linings.

06 CNA check before initial tacking

Each panel was carefully aligned to be true and plumb prior to temporary fixing.  Final fixing of panels to bottom plate and adding panels occurs when all panels are in place.

08 CNA SIPS panel alignment

The hiab operator was quite familiar with the installation process. While the builders were checking for true and plumb panel alignment and temporarily fixing the panels, the hiab operator had another panel lined up and ready to be lowered into place.

09 CNA SIPS panel in place

The accuracy of the panels was outstanding, this panel simply slid into place and did not require any adjustment. Panels with raking heads also fitted together with a high level of accuracy.

10 CNA SIPS panel splice

Where walls were too large to be transported as one, individual sections could be spliced together on site.  The Kingspan Tek system has a smaller piece or ‘splice’ of Sips panel that fits within the depth of the insulation core which is then fixed to the two adjoining Sips panels. This provides a very strong and easy connection but more importantly it provides a complete thermal barrier of urethane with no thermal bridging between inside and out.

11 CNA SIPS panels installed

The house comes together very quickly and gives an immediate idea of how the windows and doors frame the various views. Structure, insulation and sheathing all in one.

13 CNA SIPS house after an afternoons installation

The installation of these panels took a single afternoon.  The following day all panels were checked and adjusted where needed prior to final fixing.

15 CNA SIPS Double top plateFollowing this timber framed elements were added. This included framing for items such as bay windows, roof beams, internal walls and the addition of a continuos top plate.

14 CNA SIPS add internal framing

With the addition of framing, we had to start thinking about achieving a complete air tight environment. Because of the low pitch of the roof we opted for a traditional timber framed structure.  Any external timber framing achieved air tightness by the addition of an Proclima ‘Intello’ humidity variable moisture control layer.  Here you can see a section of Proclima Intel Plus connection strip which will run over the top of all internal timber walls.

19 CNA SIPS Insulated lintel

The SIPs panels are easier to seal. The builders drill holes around all panel connections and inject expanding foam to fill any air gaps. Then these holes and holes for any lifting eyes are taped with Proclima Tescon tape as per the photo above.  All joints between panels (in line or at corners) are also tapped to ensure an airtight seal.  In the above photo you can see that the lintels were held back from the external face  so that when the top plate is installed the entire lintel can be covered with a layer of high grade insulation minimising thermal bridging across the face of the lintel.

17 CNA SIPS Box beam

With the addition of plywood box beams, lintels and verandah posts the bones of the house are complete.  The area of external timber framing is a storeroom that adjoins the triple carport. Electrical services are bought into the building at this point and with the reduced need for insulation to this room, timber framing became an option.

 

 

 

 

 


Situation Vacant : Experienced Architectural Technician

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

We are looking for an experienced Architectural Technician to join us in our Wanaka studio.

We are a small design based NZIA practice with passion and focus on site-specific, energy efficient, contemporary residential projects mainly in the Queenstown Lakes District and Central Otago, but also further afield in NZ.  We work with both NZ and overseas clients who want to achieve the ultimate kiwi lifestyle.  We take a client-centric approach with personalised service and open communication, all within a creative and collaborative environment.  Current projects include residential and commercial projects in Wanaka, Queenstown Central Otago and Wellington.  We love living amongst the lakes and mountains and are avid skiers and mountain bikers. Our studio has great views to the mountains and we are located within walking distance to the lake and the town centre.

Your role will be to produce clear thorough and concise contract & tender documentation.  You will liaise directly with clients, sub-consultants, councils, suppliers and contractors.

We will consider an outgoing person with the following skills & attributes;

– Confident, well-organised, professional manner, with good communication skills.

– Friendly, honest and with good interpersonal skills and with a good sense of humour.

– Imaginative, enthusiastic and motivated, with a can do attitude.

– The ability to problem solve and apply logical thinking.

– A high level of interest and understanding of how materials and components are put together, melding beautiful design with ‘build-ability’.

– Good knowledge of environmentally sensitive construction, sustainability and energy efficient design.

– Comprehensive technical knowledge of building systems and construction techniques and methodologies.

– Thorough understanding of the NZ Building Code, NZ standards and regulatory processes.

– Excellent graphic presentation skills, both hand-drawn and computer generated.

– A proficient operator of ArchiCad as both a BIM modeling tool and 3D presentation tool.

– The ability to work collaboratively as a team player but also to work independently showing initiative and good time management to steer a project from concept stage through to physical delivery.

This is a full time salaried position so permanent NZ residency is essential. There is some scope for flexibility in working hours enabling you to be inspired, able to enjoy your work and achieve a good work / life balance.

You will work with assistance and support from both a registered architect and the practice director.  Ongoing professional development is encouraged and fostered.  We pay professional memberships and offer support with continuing professional development or assistance toward NZRAB registration.

Good remuneration appropriate to experience, skills and development.

Please email your CV and 4 or 5 examples of your work by 9th January 2017 to;

The Practice Manager

admin@chrisnorman.co.nz